Samara Golden

Technology and sound bring the artist’s sculptures to life.

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Samara Golden. Courtesy of the artist.

Samara Golden

Technology and sound bring the artist’s sculptures to life.

Samara Golden uses sound and technology to animate her found and handmade sculptural forms—and to immerse the viewer in the otherworldly. Videos are projected on any available surface, and fragmented mirrors implicate the audience in Golden’s dramatically lit surreal scenes. “I have really intense attachments to every single thing 
in the work,” says the Los Angeles–based artist. “It’s the only way for me build up a strong enough emotional pitch, so that when other people go 
into it, they will be able to have their own feelings.” For the Hammer Museum’s “Made in L.A. 2014” biennial, Golden, 41, will present the latest iteration of Busts: My Personal Winter, a perpetual work in progress she began in 2010. Recently, she added sculptural depictions of people who have observed 
or discussed the pieces thus far. “The idea,” says Golden, whose next solo show is slated for New York’s Canada gallery in September, “is that over 
my lifetime it will grow to be a very complicated 
big sculpture.”

Samara Golden painting

Samara Golden’s Mass Murder, 2014. Courtesy of the artist.