Mark A. Landis at work. Photograph by Sam Cullman.
Mark A. Landis at work. Photograph by Sam Cullman.

Mark A. Landis has spent the past two decades forging artworks—from Disney cells to blue-period Picassos—only to donate them (posing as, say, a priest) to dozens of museums. He’s never been to prison, as it’s not a crime to donate forged art, but Landis, who suffers from schizophrenia, nonetheless has lived mostly in isolation. “This was a way he came up with to be social,” says Jennifer Grausman, who with codirector Sam Cullman captured him in Art and Craft, a riveting documentary (at right, a still of Landis). The film’s delicious twist comes thanks to Landis’s foil, former Oklahoma City Museum of Art (OKCMOA) registrar Matthew Leininger, who after discovering that a work Landis has given to his museum is a fake, sets out to expose him. But, Grausman says, Leininger’s persistence only elevated Landis’s stature: His forgeries are now featured in “Intent to Deceive,” a traveling group show that will reach OKCMOA in 2015.