FRIEZE NY

What the Artists at Frieze New York 2017 Are Trying to Tell Us

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

With Leonardo DiCaprio—or at least, a very close Leo approximation—stopping in the middle of the fair to scan the Financial Times, reading is officially in at Frieze New York 2017, which kicked off on Thursday with no shortage of text art. Tracey Emin’s ever-present neons share the stage with orange-lit art by the Chilean artist Alfredo Jaar. Not too far away is Susan Cianciolo’s freewheeling work at Bridget Donahue’s booth, where a pizza recipe screaming toppings of kale, chopped olives, and “raddishes” can be found next to the paintings, garment designs, and watercolors above her tapestry floor installation. Meanwhile, Tom Sachs turned his attention a bit more earth-wards and brought a bit of McDonald’s to the land of $18 bagels, while the Eastern Cape artist Mawande Ka Zenzile outlined a list of goals for the black nationalist movement for his South African gallery. Study up on all their messages, here.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Adriano Costa, The Butcher’s Arms, 2016, at Mendes Wood DM.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Tracey Emin, And So I Loved You!, 2015, at Xavier Hufkens.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Stefan Brüggermann, ALLOW ACTION (…), 2017, at Parra & Romero.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Alfredo Jaar, Be Afraid of the Enormity of the Possible, 2015, at Galerie Lelong.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

John Giorno at Elizabeth Dee Gallery.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Ricci Albenda, baby what a big surprise!, 2017, at Andrew Kreps Gallery.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Susan Cianciolo at Bridget Donahue.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Karl Holmqvist, Untitled, 2016, at Gavin Brown’s enterprise.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Tom Sachs, McDonald’s, 2017, at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Cieblle Cavalli Bastos, The Artist is Presence, 2017, at Mendes Wood DM.

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Photo by Daniel Dorsa

Mawande Ka Zenzile at Stevenson (South Africa).