FASHION

One for the Ages


Diego Della Valle is perhaps Silvio Berlusconi’s most outspoken critic. Following him from the colosseum to his palatial home, Andrea Lee asks: could the man who made Tod’s a household name become the next great Italian emperor?

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Stylist: Jane How

The men in the family (clockwise from left)—Diego Della Valle’s nephew Matteo Procaccioli, son Emanuele, brother Andrea, Diego, and his father, Dorino—in the living room of Della Valle’s Casette d’Ete home.

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Stylist: Jane How

Della Valle’s 17th-century home, formerly owned by a count.

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Stylist: Jane How

His 198-foot yacht, Altair.

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Stylist: Jane How

The Tod’s office-factory in Casette d’Ete, with a photograph by Giovanni Gastel.

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Stylist: Jane How

The courtyard of Della Valle’s Casette d’Ete home.

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Stylist: Jane How

Della Valle commutes by helicopter from his home in Casette d’Ete.

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Stylist: Jane How

Larger than life onscreen, with Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

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Stylist: Jane How

At a press conference to present his plans for a high-speed train service.

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Stylist: Jane How

At the Colosseum

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Stylist: Jane How

Della Valle (center) with (from left) son Emanuele and grandson Giacomo, nephew Matteo, father Dorino, and brother Andrea in the courtyard of Della Valle’s home in Casette d’Ete.

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Stylist: Jane How

Della Valle’s eldest son, Emanuele.

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Stylist: Jane How

The Marlin, which once belonged to John F. Kennedy.

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Stylist: Jane How

Della Valle and grandson Giacomo in the living room of Della Valle’s Casette d’Ete home.

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Stylist: Jane How

Della Valle’s collection of globes

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Stylist: Jane How

His 12-acre Capri villa was built in the 1500s.

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Stylist: Jane How

Della Valle in his villa on Capri

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Stylist: Jane How

An aerial view of Villa del Palombarone.

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Stylist: Jane How

Della Valle’s youngest son, Filippo.