INTERIORS

Holy Moly

Ugo Rondinone has converted an abandoned church into one of the most divine live/work spaces in New York.


Photographed: Jason Schmidt
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Photographed: Jason Schmidt

Ugo Rondinone, in his Harlem studio, with works in progress.

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Photographed: Jason Schmidt

An Italian ceramic zebra holds court in the living room among Rondinone’s tree sculpture Bright Shiny Morning, 1997, Sarah Lucas’s phallic Oboddaddy 2, 2010, Valentin Carron’s cannon, Le Souffleteur, 2005, and, on the wall, from left, Peter Halley’s Stacked Rocks (Cinema Cavern), 1990, and Cady Noland’s metal newsprint works, Untitled, 1989, and her Untitled (The Lincoln Years), 1990. The covered chairs are by West.

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Photographed: Jason Schmidt

A stained glass piece by Urs Fischer in the bathroom.

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Photographed: Jason Schmidt

In the dining area, Franz West chairs flank a table by Rondinone—on which rest maquettes for his upcoming “Seven Magic Mountains” installation—and on the wall are etchings by Paul Thek, 1975–1992, and Bruno Gironcoli’s sculpture, Head, 1964.

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Photographed: Jason Schmidt

A West side table supports Fischer’s Sigh, Sigh, Sherlock!, 2004, and on the wall is Latifa Echakhch’s Frame, 2012.

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Photographed: Jason Schmidt

The exterior of the church.

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Photographed: Jason Schmidt

Valentin Carron’s I Miss the 20th Century, 2006, hangs above Rondinone’s bed; Martin Boyce’s chair sculpture, Anatomy (for Saul Bass), 2003, sits below Verne Dawson’s Coronation, 2004.

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Photographed: Jason Schmidt

Rondinone’s living and dining area, with its soaring stained glass windows.