Even though TV and film franchises rarely ever end these days, it's easy enough to believe that Big Little Lies is truly one and done. Just look at the evidence. For one, it's based on Liane Moriarty's book of the same name, and that book doesn't have a sequel or follow-up of any kind. There's the fact that director Jean-Marc Vallée has explicitly stated that he is not down for a second run. "To do a Season 2, I'm not for it," he told The Hollywood Reporter. Then, of course, there's the matter that the cast is unbelievably stacked with otherwise in-demand talent: [Reese Witherspoon] (http://www.wmagazine.com/story/reese-witherspoon-madeline-big-little-lies-hbo-finale), Nicole Kidman, Laura Dern, Shailene Woodley, Zoë Kravitz, Adam Scott, and Alexander Skarsgård all have busy film careers of their own. Considering that list, it's a miracle that the logistics ever cohered enough to get Big Little Lies on TV in the first place.

But as unlikely as a second season seems, it turns out that rumors of the Big Little Lies limited run may just be the biggest littlest lie of them all. Speaking with the Sydney Morning Herald, Moriarty revealed that producers have asked her to drum up some ideas for a potential second season. Even though the Australian author still isn't keen on writing a sequel, she says, "I have started to think about ways this could continue. ... I wouldn't write a new book but perhaps a new story and then we'll see what happens."

Moriarty also has a sense of where Big Little Lies could go. For one, although she loved the show and found HBO's take on her work "more faithful that I expected it to be," Moriarty was disappointed that the series left out Bonnie's (Kravitz) backstory. [Ed's note: a few spoilers ahead] Although both the show and the book depict Bonnie as the one who ultimately pushes the abusive rapist Perry (Alexander Skarsgård) to his death, the show only alludes to her motivations (if that). In the book, it's explained: Bonnie grew up with an abusive father and recognized the signs in Perry's interactions with Celeste (Kidman). Moriarty suggests a second season might be a good place to address the information, saying, "My original reaction was what have they done? How have they left that out? ... I think I might have preferred to have had it in there, but I wouldn't argue against it either. It also leaves open the possibility of Season 2."

Moriarty also sees fertile ground in Celeste's future, as the show ends with her freed from—but still grieving—the husband who hurt her. "That's the question that's also a really interesting thing, when you've been through a relationship like that, how do you feel now? How would she feel? She's grieving. She's still grieving for the end of a terrible relationship, and I think that would be a really interesting thing to explore," Moriarty said.

Of course, as excited at some fans will be at the prospect of a continuation, others are sure to lobby for letting a strong ending stick. If HBO does ultimately decide in favor of the former, we have some ideas.

At 49, Actress Nicole Kidman Is Still Quite Impressionable: