NERD PROM

Samantha Bee Gleefully Disrupts Washington’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner Weekend

Talking with Samantha Bee and the Washington elite at her Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner event and the other exclusive shindigs from the most subdued Nerd Prom in years.


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The first sign that this was not your usual White House Correspondents’ Dinner weekend came on Saturday at the Beall-Washington House in Georgetown, where Washington mover and shaker Tammy Haddad was throwing her annual garden brunch.

Most years, the scrum on the back patio of the stately manse includes a few models and actors mingling among the Beltway elite, with media moguls hobnobbing with the reporters who cover them, or running from them—in 2011, Rupert Murdoch had to be led to another room upon the appearance of New York magazine’s Gabriel Sherman, Fox News’ muckraking adversary.

But this year, the throng of machers had thinned, and perhaps the biggest star at the party was the actor Matt Walsh. Who? He’s an actor who plays president Selina Meyer’s press secretary on the HBO show Veep. And while a few people did approach him for selfies, the much bigger draw would have been the actual press secretary, Sean Spicer.

Samantha Bee's Not The White House Correspondents' Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

“But Trump banned the members of his administration from attending any of this stuff,” said a reporter from the New York Times, who explained that she was writing a scene roundup of parties this weekend. Such was the strange situation this weekend in Washington, D.C., as the White House Correspondents Association held a dinner to support journalists while, at the same time, the president held a campaign-style rally 100 miles away where he proclaimed that “media outlets like CNN and MSNBC are fake news, fake news.”

This had been expected for months, with Trump becoming the first sitting president to skip the WHCD since Ronald Reagan, whose absence was understandable because he had been just been shot by a would-be assassin. Reagan, however, still managed to call in. The New Yorker and Vanity Fair/Bloomberg canceled their annual soirees, and many news organizations said they would decline to buy tables at the gala, with those going saying they would bring journalists or academics as their guests, not celebrities. The lack of participation by the current administration meant that what’s usually a cozy intermingling of press corps and sources became a much more subdued Nerd Prom.

Enter Samantha Bee. Sensing a void to be filled, the host of Full Frontal on TBS announced that she would host a special on the same day as the dinner called “Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner,” to be taped during the day at the Willard Hotel and aired that night, following the coverage of the real dinner. Tables could be purchased, will all the proceeds going to the Committee to Protect Journalists.

“We’re not trying to supersede it,” Bee told the Times. “We just want to be there in case something happens—or doesn’t happen—and ensure that we get to properly roast the president.”

On Saturday afternoon, guests arrived at the veranda of Constitution Hall, many late due to the traffic surrounding the climate change protest that saw tens of thousands of people flooding the National Mall. (The march drew bigger celebrities—Leonardo DiCaprio, Richard Branson, Al Gore—than any of the Correspondents Dinner events). Everyone was in black-tie, and the 90-degree weather started to crest, causing some attendees to rip off their jackets as they waited in line at the bar. It was hotter than the muck of Mar-A-Lago in summertime.

“I took the train today from New York, and got out and was like, ‘Ah yes, the swamp!’” said the novelist Gary Shteyngart, who was shvitzing in his tuxedo. “The swamp, it’s not drained, it’s still here.”

Samantha Bee's Not The White House Correspondents' Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

MSNBC anchor Ari Melber was being approached for selfies as a producer urged everyone to take their seats, so he walked past CNN anchor Jake Tapper and actress Alia Shawkat into Constitution Hall, an historic Washington venue owned by the Daughters of the American Revolution (the location had to move from the Willard after demand forced planners to find a bigger venue.) Inside, the place had been set up to resemble a meta-gala, an event that could skewer the idea of the WHCD by sending up the concept of a fancy $100,000-a-table ceremony. Instead of an opulent multi-course meal, the fare would be what was described as “fancy-ass finger food,” which included a taco salad faithfully rendered to pay homage to the president’s Trump Tower lunch last Cinco de Mayo.

(Unlike the press being feted, the press who were actually covering the event were placed in a section above the gala tables, and each reporter was allocated two cans of refreshing Coors Light.)

A few minutes before the cameras started rolling on six different segments that were to be shot, Bee, in a white Altuzarra suit no less, came out and looked legitimately shellshocked by the auditorium full of people.

“I’ve never been in front of a crowd this big,” she said. “Is everybody having fun? Is everybody drunk?”

And then the show got started, with a violin intro followed by the singer Peaches leading an all-girl band wearing shirts that said “Free Press.” Bee began her rapid-fire scorched earth routine, while also thanking the journalists in the room for their service.

“Your job has never been harder, she said. “POTUS has convinced 88 percent of his fans that you’re an enemy of the people. You basically get paid to stand in a cage while a geriatric orangutan and his pet mob scream at you. It’s like a reverse zoo. But you carry on.”

These bits drew instant rapturous applause from the room, as they played directly to her base, with Bee whipping the room into a frenzy. The only abstainers from the whooping and clapping were, as it happened, the reporters in the press pen, who were trying to appear objective.

At one point during a break in the filming, Bee came out to say that “You’re going to want to just keep your eyes on this podium,” pointing to a stand to her left. There was, she explained, a special guest who would be appearing at some point—it was Will Ferrell, who brought his George W. Bush impression out of retirement for the occasion.

“I’ll be honest, I never liked you guys in the press,” he said, as Dubya. “You guys would always sneak up on me with gotcha questions like, ‘Why are we going to war? Gotcha!’ ‘Why didn’t you respond quicker to Hurricane Katrina? Gotcha!”

Inside the White House Correspondents’ Dinner and Samantha Bee’s Rival Party

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 29: Guests attend the 2017 White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner at Washington Hilton on April 29, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

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Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner at Washington Hilton in Washington, DC.

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Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner at Washington Hilton in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner at Washington Hilton in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner at Washington Hilton in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner at Washington Hilton in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images

Samantha Bee’s Not The White House Correspondents’ Dinner at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, DC.

Photo by Getty Images
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That was the closest anyone would get to seeing a president on Saturday. As crisply dressed attendees walked up to the Washington Hilton for the real dinner a few hours later, a pro-press demonstration took over the front lawn, with signs such as “Thank you reporters, keep up the good work” and “We are here, you are hiding, you pussy coward.”

“Don’t let Spicer get away with it!” one demonstrator yelled to David Bradley, the owner of Atlantic Media, as he walked into the Hilton. As it happened, Bradley hosted the one event that was attended by a Trump cabinet member—the dinner at his Embassy Row mansion Friday drew Gen. James Mattis, the Secretary of Defense. According to the Washington Post, after word got out that North Korea had fired a ballistic missile, Atlantic editor Jeff Goldberg announced to the crowd, “Some advice to people at dinner—if Jim Mattis leaves suddenly, we’re going to move the party to the basement!”

Once inside the Hilton, there were three stories of cocktail parties, hosted The Wall Street Journal, the Associated Press, USA Today, and others, with attendees hopping between each one. The hotter ticket, arguably, was the after party for Bee’s bash, which was held at the top-floor terrace of the W Hotel, with its unparalleled views of the East Wing of the White House, and the presidential residence, which was empty—by the time guests started arriving at the party (the president had already left for the rally in Pennsylvania). It was co-hosted by New York magazine’s Vulture, which meant staffers had been shipped down via the Acela corridor, and the site’s D.C.-based correspondents came out of the woodwork to attend.

“I mean, this is pretty elitist,” said Jonathan Chait, the magazine’s political columnist, referring to the weekend, adding that he doesn’t usually go to these things.

By the time the dinner got underway across town, Bee arrived at her own party, surrounded by a scrum of guards.

The Best White House Correspondents Dinner Pictures Ever, from Caroline Kennedy to Lindsay Lohan

The ’70s . Saturday Night Live star Chevy Chase, with then-wife Jacqueline Carlin Chase, stole the spotlight in the 1970s.

Collage by @TheCuadro. Chevy Chase, Jacqueline Carlin Chase photographed by Fred Hermansky, 1976.

The ’80s Wheel of Fortune hostess Vanna White and Sylvester Stallone were the ultimate ’80s attendees.

Collage by @TheCuadro. Sylvester Stallone, Vanna White photographed by Ron Galella, 1988.

The ’90s John F. Kennedy, Jr. and Carolyn Bessette, an iconic ’90s couple, took some of the most memorable @WhiteHouse Correspondents’ Dinner photos to date.

Collage by @TheCuadro. John F. Kennedy, Jr., Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy, James Rubin, photos by Manny Ceneta and Tyler Mallory, 1999.

John F. Kennedy, Jr. and his wife Carolyn in 1999. Photo by Tyler Mallory/Liaison.

Goldie Hawn in 2005. Photo by Lawrence Lucier/FilmMagic.

Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore in 2009. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

Chevy Chase, Jacqueline Carlin Chase in 1976. Photo by Fred Hermansky/NBCU Photo Bank.

Pamela Anderson and Dan Mathews of PETA in 2008. Photo by Jeff Snyder/FilmMagic.

Kim Kardashian in 2010. Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg.

Anna Wintour in 2013. Photo by Kris Connor/FilmMagic.

Chevy Chase, Lorne Michaels, Dan Aykroyd, John Belushi, President Gerald Ford in 1976. Photo by Fred Hermansky/NBCU Photo Bank.

Kerry Washington in 2009. Photo by Jeff Snyder/FilmMagic.

Katy Perry in 2013. Photo by Getty Images.

Irina Shayk in 2012. Photo by Kris Connor/FilmMagic.

Claire Danes in 2013. Photo by Kris Connor/FilmMagic.

Vanna White and Sylvester Stallone in 1988. Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage.

Anne Vyalitsyna attends the 101st Annual White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner at the Washington Hilton on April 25, 2015 in Washington, DC.

Melanie Trump in 2011. Photo by Getty Images.

Kate Mara in 2013. Photo by Getty Images.

Kate Hudson in 2012. Photo by Kris Connor/FilmMagic.

Dakota Fanning in 2012. Photo by Kris Connor/FilmMagic.

Kris Jenner and Kim Kardashian in 2012. Photo by Kris Connor/FilmMagic.

Lindsay Lohan in 2012. Photo by Kris Connor/FilmMagic.

Lupita Nyong’o in 2014 in. Photo by Kris Connor/FilmMagic.

The Jonas Brothers in 2008. Photo by Jeff Snyder/FilmMagic.

Heidi Montag and Spencer Pratt in 2008. Photo by Jeff Snyder/FilmMagic.

Katie Couric, Jenna Dewan-Tatum and Chrissy Teigen attend the annual White House Correspondent’s Association Gala at the Washington Hilton hotel April 25, 2015 in Washington, D.C. The dinner is an annual event attended by journalists, politicians and celebrities. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

Pool

Jessica Simpson and Jimmy Fallon attend the Bloomberg/Vanity Fair party following the 2010 White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner at the residence of the French Ambassador on May 1, 2010 in Washington, United States. Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/VF1/WireImage.

Justin Bieber in 2010. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

Trudie Styler and Sting in 2009. Photo by Jeff Snyder/FilmMagic.

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“I had such a good like…like I personally had a good time,” Bee said, standing next to platters of crab cake sliders. “I don’t really stand in front of a stage in front thousands of people. That’s not a run-of-the-mill experience for me.”

When asked whether the show would upstage the one that was about to start a few blocks away, at the Washington Hilton, she said, referring to the official dinner’s host Hasan Minhaj, “I’m friends with Hasan, and I want him to do well! I think he’s going to kill it.”

Despite alleging that people urged him to go easy on Trump as the host of the WHCD, Minhaj did not, spitting out jokes about the president’s golfing habits and alleged collusion with Russia to influence the election.

“I would say it is an honor to be here, but that would be an alternative fact—it is not,” he said. “No one wanted to do this. So of course it lands in the hands of an immigrant.”

No one at the W was paying attention to the real dinner, especially after the night’s entertainment, Elvis Costello, took the stage to start the first of his two sets.

“We were making a set list, and everything we put on sounded like the start of a joke,” he said before ripping into “Accidents Will Happen.” “But I think I’ll leave the comedy to Sam.”

Meanwhile, a little after 10:00 p.m. those on the balcony saw Marine One touch down on the South Lawn of the White House. The president disembarked, gave a thumbs up to the reporters in the press pool, and went inside, alone.

By midnight, the lights in the residence were off.

Related: Samantha Bee Talks Donald Trump and Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner

Watch: Samantha Bee and Jason Jones, Former ‘Daily Show’ Correspondents and Real-Life Couple, Discuss Falling in Love

Meet the Women Who Are Making the Women’s March on Washington Happen

The executive director of the Arab American Association of New York, Linda Sarsour — a Brooklyn native, mother of three, and now one of the national co-chairs of the Women’s March on Washington — has been working at the crossroads of civil rights, religious freedom, and racial justice for 15 years. Once an aspiring English teacher, she joined the Arab American Association in its infancy, succeeding founder Basemah Atweh, her mentor, as executive director with Atweh’s death in 2005. “I grew out of the shadow of 9/11,” Sarsour said. “What I’ve seen out of bad always comes good, is that solidarity and unity, particularly amongst communities of color who feel like they’re all impacted by the same system.”

Photo by Driely S, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Tamika D. Mallory’s roots in community organizing and activism extend back to her early childhood: her parents were two of the earliest members of the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network nearly 30 years ago, an organization for which Mallory went on to act as executive director. But it wasn’t until the death of her son’s father 15 years ago that Mallory found her niche in civil rights and flung herself headlong into activism. Now, she’s one of the four national co-chairs of the Women’s March on Washington, balancing organizing the march with her day job as a speaker and civil rights advocate. “We’re centering this march by having women to be at the helm of it, to organize it, and to be most of the speakers,” she said. “At the same time I think it’s very important that we never forget the fact that our men, our brothers, our young brothers particularly need this support.”

Photo by Victoria Stevens, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Fashion entrepreneur Bob Bland was nearing the due date of her second daughter, now seven weeks old, when she posted a Facebook event calling for a march on Washington during inauguration weekend. Nine weeks later, she’s one of four national co-chairs at the heart of the Women’s March on Washington — where she’ll march with her infant, her six-year-old daughter, and her 74-year-old mother. “We’re activating people who were previously content with sitting behind their computer and posting on Facebook,” she said.

Photo by Victoria Stevens, Produced by Biel Parklee.

For Carmen Perez, executive director of Harry Belafonte’s Gathering for Justice and one of the four national co-chairs of the Women’s March on Washington, work permeates everything else: “There’s no real life outside of activism,” she said. Just over two decades ago, Perez’s elder sister was killed — the anniversary of her burial coincides with the march, and with Perez’s birthday — and navigating the justice system motivated her to work with incarcerated young men and women, first as a probation officer and then with The Gathering, operating on the intersection of race, criminal justice, and immigration. “Oftentimes, when I’m in spaces, I am the only Latina and I have to speak a little louder for my community to be part of the conversation,” she said. “The work that I do around racial justice, it’s not just about Latino rights. It’s also about human rights.”

Photo by Hannah Sider, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Californian ShiShi Rose, 27, moved to New York a year ago to develop her activism and writing. She previously worked at a local rape crisis center and assisted in educating therapists and counselors before turning her focus more squarely towards race, first via her Instagram account and then through public speaking engagements and writing. As part of the national committee for the Women’s March on Washington, Rose runs the group’s social media channels, from Instagram (where she has a substantial following) to Facebook. “Women encompass everything,” Rose said. “If you can fight for women’s rights, you can fight for rights across the board.”

Photo by Tyra Mitchell, Produced by Biel Parklee.

A law student-turned-actress-turned-activist, Sarah Sophie Flicker was born in Copenhagen, the great-granddaughter of a Danish prime minister who has been credited with bringing democratic socialism to Denmark. She grew up in California before moving to New York to found the political cabaret Citizens Band, eventually joining the production company Art Not War. “Once you start breaking it all down, you realize the most vulnerable people in any community tend to be women,” she said. “All our issues intersect, and something that may affect me as a white woman will doubly affect a black woman or a Latina woman or an indigenous woman. So when we talk about a women’s movement, we need to be talking about all women.”

Photo by Victoria Stevens, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Vanessa Wruble, a member of the national organizing committee, is the uber-connector of the Women’s March on Washington. She’s also the founder and editor of OkayAfrica, a site connecting culture news from continental Africa with an international audience. It was Wruble who first messaged Bland on Facebook to connect her with the women who would eventually become her co-chairs: “She said, Hey, you know, you need to center women of color in the leadership of this so it can be truly inclusive,’” Bland recalled. Within a day, they were meeting for coffee; now, they’re marching together in one of the largest demonstrations in support of a vast array of causes in United States history.

Photo by Amber Mahoney, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Paola Mendoza, artistic director of the Women’s March on Washington, is a Colombian-American director and writer whose work has focused on immigrant experiences, particularly those of Latina women. “Women have never convened this way in our lifetime,” Mendoza said of the march, “and it’s being led for the first time ever by women of color.”

Photo by Victoria Stevens, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Janaye Ingram, who Michelle Obama once described as an “impressive leader,” is Head of Logistics for the March, in addition to being a consultant for issues like civil, voting, and women’s rights in Washington D.C.

Photo by Kate Warren, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Cassady Fendlay, communications director for the Women’s March on Washington, is a writer and communications strategist whose clients include The Gathering for Justice — the organization helmed by Women’s March national co-chair Carmen Perez. As the spokeswoman for the march, Fendlay is tasked with acting as its mouthpiece, ensuring its message is accurate, unified, and coherent.

Photo by Victoria Stevens, Produced by Biel Parklee.

In addition to being a producer of the march, Ginny Suss is the Vice President of Okayplayer.com and the President and co-founder of OkayAfrica — she does video production for both. Her background in the music industry runs deep, and she’s worked closely with The Roots for the past 13 years, serving as their Tour Manager for some time. She’s also produced large outdoor events like The Roots Picnic, Summerstage, Lincoln Center Out Of Doors, and Celebrate Brooklyn — vital experience for organizing a march of this size.

Photo by Amber Mahoney, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Last year, Nantasha Williams ran for the New York State Assembly as a representative of the 33rd district — which encompasses a region just east of Jamaica, Queens. Though she lost to Democrat Clyde Vanel, she’s putting her organizing skills to good use in the aftermath of the election, working on the logistics team for the march and assisting national co-chair Tamika Mallory.

Photo by Driely S, Produced by Biel Parklee.

When Alyssa Klein isn’t managing the various social media accounts for the Women’s March, she’s writer and Senior Editor at OkayAfrica, the largest online destination for New African music, culture, fashion, art, and politics. Based in both New York City and Johannesburg, Klein’s passion is movies and television, and has made it her profession to highlight creatives of color in both industries. Juggling social media is no easy side project, however. The Women’s March has approximately 80,000 followers on Instagram and Twitter, plus a over 200,000 on Facebook.

Photo by Amber Mahoney, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Shirley Marie Johnson is the March’s head administrator for Tennessee, as well as an author, poet, and singer. Primarily, though, she’s an activist and advocate for those who are victim to domestic violence, a cause that’s not only her focus at the March, but in her day-to-day life through her group Exodus, Inc., which aids those affected by rape, human trafficking, and other abuse.

Photo by Alysse Gafkjen, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Born in Shanghai, Ting Ting Cheng studied human rights at the University of Cape Town — and became an award-winning Fulbright scholar to South Africa — before heading to New York, where she’s now a criminal defense attorney at the Brooklyn Defender Services. All that’s no doubt come in handy for her role as Legal Director of the March.

Photo by Amber Mahoney, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Heidi Solomon is one of the three co-organizers for the Pennsylvania chapter of the Women’s March. Although she doesn’t have a long background in activism, Trump’s election moved her to take action, and she’s helped rally approximately 6,000 people from her home state.

Photo by Lauren Driscoll, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Deborah Harris is a grassroots organizer and feminist self-help author who lives in Las Vegas, Nevada, and served as a community activist for 10 years in the fields of fashion, healthcare, at risk youth, and supportive women’s relations.

Photo by Heather Gildroy.

As Illinois’ state representative for the Women’s March, Mrinalini Chakraborty has taken the lead in coordinating the Chicago-area charge, organizing bus rides for well over a thousand women and other supporters. She’s also on the National Committee and is a coordinator for all 50 states coming to D.C.. And that’s in addition to her day job: She’s a graduate teaching and research assistant at the University of Illinois at Chicago for anthropology, not to mention a student and a dedicated food blogger.

Photo by Alina Tsvor, Produced by Biel Parklee.

After earning her Ph.D in psychology, Dr. Deborah Johnson is now studying social work at the University of Oklahoma in Tulsa — and making sure she stands up for both her and her daughter’s rights at the March, which she’s helping lead the way to for other Oklahomans.

Photo by Sarah Roberts, Produced by Biel Parklee.

Renee Singletary is an organizer, mother of two, wife of one, marketing consultant, and certified herbalist living and working in Charleston, South Carolina.

Photo by Lauren Jonas, Produced by Biel Parklee. Hair by Katrina Lawyer, makeup by Elizabeth Desmond.

A yoga instructor, theater graduate, and local organizer, South Carolina native Evvie Harmon has brought her skills and energy to the march as its global co-coordinator alongside Breanne Butler. Together, they facilitate partner marches and local organizers around the world, bringing the whole thing into synergy.

Photo by Kate Warren, Produced by Biel Parklee.
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