Margot Robbie
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You may know Margot Robbie as the blonde-haired queen of the red carpet and silver screen, but the actress is looking far from her usual pristine self for her upcoming role in Mary, Queen of Scots as a more literal type of royal: Queen Elizabeth I.

The star has been filming the project in England this summer, and if the paparazzi snaps are any indication, she's hardly recognizable. In keeping with historical representations of the first Queen Elizabeth, Robbie is sporting short, red, curly hair, not to mention a much higher hairline and no makeup to speak of (though, more likely, tons of makeup, to make her look as though she’s wearing none—hey, it takes some work to make Robbie not look like herself). Let’s just say her newest transformation is a far cry from her role as Leonardo DiCaprio’s wife in The Wolf of Wall Street.

A closer look at the snap of Robbie on the set seems to indicate that makeup artists have even gone as far as morphing her normally flawless skin into a more blotchy, uneven complexion for the role. The Daily Mail even suggests that the 27-year-old Australian beauty was fitted with a prosthetic nose to complete her Elizabethan transformation. What’s more, while one image caught Robbie in a classic black hoodie, another put her Tudor apparel—including a large corset, cropped jacket, and long pleated skirt—on display.

Bette Davis, Judi Dench, Cate Blanchett, Helen Mirren, and more have all played the monarch at various stages of her life, so Margot Robbie is surely in good company stepping into this role. She'll act alongside Saoirse Ronan, who will take on the role of Mary, as well as on-the-rise actor Jack Lowden, who most recently starred in Dunkirk. Mary, Queen of Scots will reportedly focus on the titular character's early life, in addition to her relationship with her storied half-sister.

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