FASHION

The Best Looks From the Pre-Fall 2022 Collections

by Maxine Wally and W Staff
Updated: 
Originally Published: 

Stella McCartney

Even before 2020, the rhythm of the fashion calendar had been fracturing as some designers broke free from showing within the confines of spring/summer and fall/winter, instead opting to release collections whenever they pleased. Now, all bets are still off—and the pre-fall/cruise seasons are no different. Brands including Fendi, The Row, and even Gucci—which showed its collection with a spectacle of a runway presentation that took place on Hollywood Boulevard and featured over 500 guests—have been putting out their takes on pre-fall since September of this year. We’re following the ongoing releases right here, tracking the latest drops from Proenza Schouler, Chloé, Erdem, (which just released its first menswear line), and more.

Stella McCartney
Courtesy of Stella McCartney

For pre-fall, Stella McCartney drew inspiration from her father Paul’s former bandmate, John Lennon—most specifically the suiting the late singer wore in the ‘70s. But it wasn’t all business. The pleasure of the decade, namely disco, revealed itself in diamante detailing, halter silhouettes, and glittering lurex knits. As always, the brand upheld its commitment to more sustainable practices with 72% of the ready-to-wear being created from responsible materials including deadstock fabric, recycled nylon, and regenerative wool.

Stella McCartney
Courtesy of Stella McCartney
Stella McCartney
Courtesy of Stella McCartney
Christopher John Rogers
Courtesy of Christopher John Rogers

The American designer Christopher John Rogers once told W that his dream client would be his own mother. At the time, he was designing a red suit for her—and I can’t help but think the offerings in his standout Collection 009 lineup, which delivers as pre-fall, was also designed with mom in mind. Although the matriarch of the Rogers family is endlessly chic, don’t get it twisted: Christopher John Rogers pre-fall 2022 is not your mother’s average collection. This is a neon-colored, runway-ready celebration of ladylike fashions tinged with 1980s silhouettes: tailored suits come with shoulder pads, colorways call to mind Miami Vice, and feathered hats evoke the American South—which is a constant inspiration for Rogers and his house codes.

Christopher John Rogers
Courtesy of Christopher John Rogers
Christopher John Rogers
Courtesy of Christopher John Rogers
Christopher John Rogers
Courtesy of Christopher John Rogers
Christopher John Rogers
Courtesy of Christopher John Rogers
Givenchy
Courtesy of Givenchy

Givenchy designer Matthew M. Williams returned to the French house’s foundational codes for pre-fall 2022—through a lens of ultra-modernity. An enviable range of feathered bags and shoes (Our favorite? A bucket bag with a plume of black feathers sprouting out of the top) launched alongside tailored garments and technical outerwear sporting geometric details and U-lock hardware on closures. Lace bucket hats were worn with checkered lumberjack flannels and fashionable sneakers.

Givenchy
Courtesy of Givenchy
Givenchy
Courtesy of Givenchy
Givenchy
Courtesy of Givenchy
Christian Dior

For her latest outing, Maria Grazia Chiuri looked to rule-breaking women, namely Catherine Dior, Christian’s sister who was a fighter in the French Resistance and the subject of Justine Picardie’s new book Miss Dior: A Story of Courage and Couture. Twisted yellow tartans, sheer layered dresses, skinny ties, and biker shorts nodded to the designer’s own rebellious spirit during her Catholic school years.

Christian Dior
Christian Dior
Helmut Lang
Courtesy of Helmut Lang

Helmut Lang brought its signature flair for minimalist, utilitarian uniforms to pre-fall—with a cheeky and, at times, sparkling twist here and there. Minibags and trench coats were sprinkled with sequins while office-ready jackets were done in lime green—and suits featured zip-up pockets on the arms. Blink and you might miss the teeny details that make this collection so special.

Helmut Lang
Courtesy of Helmut Lang
Helmut Lang
Courtesy of Helmut Lang
Helmut Lang
Courtesy of Helmut Lang
Helmut Lang
Courtesy of Helmut Lang
Balmain
Courtesy of Balmain

It’s hard to believe that Balmain designer Olivier Rousteing is wrapping up his 10-year anniversary at the French house, but it’s true—the 36-year-old creative director has spent a decade making pieces that have attracted the likes of every Kardashian-Jenner, Beyoncé, J.Lo, and many more. For pre-fall 2022, Rousteing was inspired by Kurt Cobain and grunge—applying that deconstructed look to some of his most famed pearl-embellished dresses for women and onto sweaters for men. Super-sized jeans had back pockets on the front, boots and gloves were made by the moto racing company Fox, and chunky boots—of the military and moon varieties—abounded.

Balmain
Courtesy of Balmain
Balmain
Courtesy of Balmain
Balmain
Courtesy of Balmain
Moschino
Courtesy of Moschino

If Jeremy Scott’s Moschino spring 2022 collection was inspired by newborn babies, his pre-fall effort for the Italian label was meant for the dolls those babies’ toddler siblings dress up during playtime. Every color under the sun was rendered in military-style jackets, lace-up boots, and marching band coats. Space Age hoods met chevron prints, too—as seen here.

Moschino
Courtesy of Moschino
Moschino
Courtesy of Moschino
Balenciaga

Demna Gvasalia dropped his last name and all modern trappings for the release of Balenciaga’s pre-fall 2022 collection titled The Lost Tape. Outsized raver silhouettes and post-grunge details recall the ‘90s, or what’s referred to in the show notes as Balenciaga’s forgotten years.

Balenciaga
Balenciaga
Chanel

Chanel staged its annual Métiers d’Art show—a showcase of its many legendary artisans—in a Paris space dedicated to the crafts people themselves. The newly opened 19M building complex houses 11 of its famed partners in design from milliner Maison Michel to the embroiderers of Lesage. The maximalist collection was set to a performance by Soo Joo Park, who both walked the runway and made her debut as the musician Ether. Per Virginie Viard in the show notes, “Many of the embroideries are inspired by the structure of the building itself, such as those by Montex, which are very graphic and in silver sequins.”

Chanel
Chanel
Batsheva
Courtesy of Batsheva

For her pre-fall 2022 collection, the New York City-based designer Batsheva Hay focused on what her label Batsheva is calling the “return of the dress.” It makes sense—the cult favorite brand made a splash in 2018 when it debuted its signature range of Laura Ashley-inspired prairie dresses. This season, there are frocks aplenty, with many new shapes and silhouettes in graphic palettes of black, white, and pops of color, along with floral prints—and new materials, too, like the latex garment shown here.

Batsheva
Courtesy of Batsheva
Batsheva
Courtesy of Batsheva
Proenza Schouler

Proenza Schouler designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez have taken their vision for pre-fall literally: the looks are an amalgamation of codes first introduced in spring 2022, and will build upon new ideas to be introduced in fall 2022. The clothing and accessories focus on soft, easy suiting—often fastened with just one button—contrasted with animal print and bright colors.

Proenza Schouler
Proenza Schouler
Proenza Schouler
Erdem

Designer Erdem Moralioglu was inspired by the British painter Eileen Agar for pre-fall 2022—an artist born in Buenos Aires, Argentina who was one of the key figures in the Surrealist movement. The result: midi skirts, Mary Janes, and vibrant prints on tea-length dresses—quintessential English dressing.

Erdem
Erdem
Erdem
Chloé

Gabriela Hearst put out a sustainable effort this season, with ’80s-esque leather pilot jackets like the one seen here, belted long skirts and cutout peasant blouses, along with a slew of outstanding printed coats.

Chloé
Chloé
Chloé
The Row

Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen put a topsy turvy twist on tailoring with jackets and suiting worn back-to-front. Loose silhouettes, soft hoods, and leather accessories for every technical need offer ease back into office life.

The Row
The Row

This article was originally published on