MTV Unplugged: Nirvana

Kurt Cobain's Nirvana "Unplugged" Guitar Is Awarded to Frances Bean Cobain's Ex in Her Divorce

There are few guitars with more history than Kurt Cobain's acoustic one, which he played during Nirvana's 1993 "MTV Unplugged." Now, it has a new owner: the ex-husband of the late artist's daughter Frances Bean Cobain. The lingering legal issues of her divorce from Isaiah Silva, her husband of two years, were just finalized, and he was awarded the 1959 Martin D-18E, TMZ reports.

One year ago, in the midst of their divorce, Cobain filed documents requesting the court to return the guitar to her, which Silva had claimed was a gift from her to him. At the time, Cobain called it a "priceless family heirloom." However, her attempt to salvage the guitar ultimately failed. As sad as it is that Cobain wasn't able to retrieve a piece of her late father who died when she was just one year old, she otherwise made out well in the divorce.

Outside of gifting the guitar to Silva, Cobain will not be giving him anything else. Silva's request for $25,000 a month in spousal support was denied, and he also walked away without the house they bought or reimbursement for his legal bills.

Back in 2015, Cobain opened up about her father's musical legacy, revealing that, actually, she's not really a fan of Nirvana. "I don't really like Nirvana that much. Sorry, promotional people, Universal," she told Rolling Stone. "I'm more into Mercury Rev, Oasis, Brian Jonestown Massacre [laughs]. The grunge scene is not what I'm interested in. But 'Territorial Pissings' [on Nevermind] is a fucking great song. And 'Dumb' [on In Utero]—I cry every time I hear that song. It's a stripped-down version of Kurt's perception of himself—of himself on drugs, off drugs, feeling inadequate to be titled the voice of a generation."

Still, even though she might not put on Nevermind in her own home, Cobain welcomes hearing songs from it and her father out in the world. "I was around 15 when I realized he was inescapable," she said. "Even if I was in a car and had the radio on, there's my dad. He's larger than life and our culture is obsessed with dead musicians. We love to put them on a pedestal. If Kurt had just been another guy who abandoned his family in the most awful way possible .. . . But he wasn't. He inspired people to put him on a pedestal, to become St. Kurt. He became even bigger after he died than he was when he was alive. You don't think it could have gotten any bigger. But it did."

Related: Frances Bean Cobain Has Dreams of Creating the World's First "Comic Book Cookbook"