Prince Harry And Meghan Markle Visit Edinburgh

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's Wedding Flowers Are Revealed (and They'll Help Save the Bees)

As Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s impending wedding draws closer, the couple is locking down all the critical details for the big day. They set a date (May 19); they revealed their wedding cake, to be served at the reception at Windsor Castle (a lemon-elderflower confection decorated with buttercream and fresh flowers, despite previous rumors it would be a banana cake); and they set the venue (St. George’s Chapel, a frequent location for royal weddings but one that sets them apart from Kate and William, at least).

The latest development: the selection of flower arrangements, which will be designed by the London-based florist Philippa Craddock and feature buds in pink and white sourced from the Crown Estate, Windsor Great Parks, and the Royal Parks, as the Kensington Palace official Instagram announced Sunday. (One can only assume—or hope—that the flower arrangements will coordinate with the flower-themed cake.) Craddock, who established her namesake floral design studio in 2009, is well known among the British fashion elite—she operates a shop out of Selfridge's, and her clients include Alexander McQueen, Dior, Jo Malone, Hermès, and Lancôme, in addition to the British tea brand Fortnum & Mason. She teased the composition of the arrangements on her own account, writing that they “will be using plenty of locally sourced greenery and seasonal flowers including peonies, garden roses and foxgloves.” (Peonies are, apparently, Markle’s flower of choice.)

The wedding is shaping up to be a sustainable spring-floral fever dream, what with the flower-topped cake and the abundant flowers that will garnish the event. The cake will emphasize seasonal ingredients, while the floral arrangements will “reflect the wild and natural landscapes from which many of the plants will be drawn,” the Kensington Palace Instagram announcement wrote. Wild and natural, right down to the tree branches (beech, birch, and hornbeam, a species best known from the pages of Harry Potter) that will apparently be interspersed throughout the flowers. Topping it all off, the Royal Parks are sending over some of their finest “pollinator-friendly plants,” which “provide a great habitat for bees and help to sustain a healthy and biodiverse ecosystem.” Didn’t you know the bees are dying?

Most generously, the royal couple plans to donate the arrangements to charity, even though it’s not entirely clear how a charity might put them to use. In any case, we will be waiting with bated breath to see the outstanding details: the catering menu and, obviously, the gown.

Related: Is Meghan Markle Really Breaking So Many Royal Traditions?