Cate Blanchett wearing a fur coat

Cate Blanchett Hopes One Day She Has Wrinkles Like Louise Bourgeois

Aside from Naomi Campbell and Jennifer Lopez, there may be no celebrity who has remained ageless in the public eye for as long as Cate Blanchett. And while that’s been a source of fascination for the rest of us, it barely ever crosses the mind of the 49-year-old actress and face of Armani, as she told British Vogue in a new interview about fragrance and fashion.

Blanchett’s makeup routine, she explained, is remarkably pared-down, consisting only of mascara and matte Armani lipstick; she made no mention of anti-wrinkle cream, a subject that is practically requisite in these types of interviews. This is all the more notable because Blanchett was famously the face of the skincare company SK-II for 15 years (i.e., more than half of the lifetime of Cara Delevingne, the 25-year-old face of Dior’s antiaging line).

Blanchett’s contract with SK-II, however, came to an end in 2018, which might be why she got even more candid than usual on the topic of aging. “I don’t think about aging at all until someone brings it up,” she said. “[When] I think of some of the most inspiring faces, it’s Louise Bourgeois and Georgia O’Keeffe. I’m looking into the spirit of the woman and that’s what I love.”

Suffice to say, those beauty inspirations are not exactly J. Lo. But O’Keeffe did in fact become the original supermodel (not to mention style icon) in her 30s, when she repeatedly posted (occasionally nude) for portraits taken by her then husband, the photographer Alfred Stieglitz. And Cecil Beaton, Richard Avedon, and Annie Leibovitz seem to agree with Blanchett—they all made the trek to the artist’s home in New Mexico to photograph O’Keeffe, who entertained a steady stream of visitors like Calvin Klein right up until her death, in 1986, at age 98. That happens to be the same age that Bourgeois was when she passed away, in 2010; by then, her weathered face had received nearly as much as attention as her art. (A New York Times profile of Bourgeois in 1997, for example, describes the artist’s face as being “as wrinkled as a walnut.”)

Louise Bourgeois, photographed during the last year of her life, by Alex Van Gelder for W magazine.

Aging isn’t the only topic Blanchett has said she pays much less attention to than others. As she told W in an interview with Miuccia Prada last October: “I rarely think about my gender until it’s pointed out to me, generally in interviews.” Or, for that matter, until it’s unduly forced upon her: “The adjectives that are applied to me—I’m ‘forceful’ or I ‘take no prisoners,’ all because I express an opinion that I was asked for.”

Related: Georgia O’Keeffe Was the Original American Supermodel