Emily Ratajkowski sent a clear message towards Harvey Weinstein yesterday. When the star arrived at last night’s Los Angeles premiere of Uncut Gems (produced by her husband Sebastian Bear-McClard) in a black Hervé Leger dress, she showed off a message scrawled on her arm that read “Fuck Harvey.” A good accessory.

On Wednesday, New York Times reporters Meghan Twohey and Jodi Kantor, the same journalists who busted open the Weinstein story in 2017, published a report that Weinstein and his former studio, the Weinstein Company, have reached a tentative $25 million settlement with his dozens of victims. The kicker? Weinstein won’t have to pay anything out of his own pocket, or personally admit any wrongdoing.

Weinstein is still awaiting trial in Manhattan on charges of sexual assault involving two different women. The $25 million settlement is just about half of a package totaling $47 million that the Weinstein Company is using to settle its debts and obligations. Nearly a quarter of the total—$12 million— will be used to cover portions of the legal costs for Weinstein, his brother Bob, and other board members.

“Today Harvey Weinstein and his former studio made a $25 million deal with his victims,” Ratajkowski tweeted last night with a selfie. “Weinstein, accused of offenses ranging from sexual harassment to rape, won't have to admit wrongdoing or pay his own money. #nojusticenopeace #HarveyWeinstein

“No justice, no peace,” a phrase popularized by the Reverend Al Sharpton in 1986 after three black men were attacked by a white mob in Howard Beach in Queens, is perhaps not the right terminology to throw out here. But maybe that’s a bit nitpicky. The news about Weinstein was met with a mass outcry of anger and disappointment. It feels right that it was addressed at a major movie premiere.

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Ratajkowski has been an outspoken supporter of the #MeToo movement since its emergence in 2017. Last year, she was arrested alongside more than 300 others (including Amy Schumer) while protesting Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. She carried a sign to the hearings that read “Respect female existence or expect our resistance.”