Jared Kushner

UNITED STATES - JULY 24: Jared Kushner, the President' Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, leaves the Hart Senate Office Building.

Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

Jared Kushner has been given the responsibility of brokering peace in the Middle East as well as serving to the President of the United States — his father-in-law Donald Trump — as a senior adviser. But, as if it wasn't already clear, perhaps those tasks are overly ambitious considering Ivanka Trump's husband once struggled to grasp the basics of how to fill out his voter registration. According to a new report by Wired, which obtained records from the New York State Board of Elections, Kushner registered to vote as a woman. While it's possible that Kushner accidentally checked off the female option on his voter registration, Kushner's own history of successfully filling out paperwork is spotty. As Wired points out, Kushner botched his security clearance form not once but three times. Intentional or not, on his first attempt Kushner listed zero contact with foreign governments, CBS News reported, despite having met with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya, who allegedly promised Kushner and Trump "damaging information" about Hillary Clinton, per The New York Times. Kushner also omitted her name from the second attempt after listing more than 100 names and, later, he finally added it to his third stab at security clearance.

"There has been a good deal of misinformation reported about my SF-86 form," Kushner later attempted to clear up during his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, as obtained by CNN. "As my attorneys and I have previously explained, my SF-86 application was prematurely submitted due to a miscommunication and initially did not list any contacts (not just with Russians) with foreign government officials." Kushner explained his first failed attempt at filling out the form as "my assistant interpreted [a] message as meaning that the entire form was completed." "At that point, the form was a rough draft and still had many omissions including not listing any foreign government contacts and even omitted the address of my father-in-law (which was obviously well known)," he testified. Kushner later defended omitting Veselnitskaya's name by saying, "For reasons that should be clear from the explanation of that meeting I have provided, I did not remember the meeting and certainly did not remember it as one with anyone who had to be included on an SF-86... I did so even though my attorneys were unable to conclude that the Russian lawyer was a representative of any foreign country and thus fell outside the scope of the form."

The fact that Kushner struggled with such a seemingly routine task of filling out his security clearance form — combined with his secret channel to communicate with Russia — is one of the reasons that Congressional Democrats have called for his clearance to be revoked, as CBS News points out. Brad Bainum, a spokesperson for American Bridge, which was the first to catch Kushner's voter registration error, also seems to think so as he told Wired, "Kushner can't even fill out the most basic paperwork without screwing it up, so it's a mystery why anyone thinks he's somehow going to bring peace to the Middle East. Would anyone but the president's son-in-law still have a West Wing job after repeated disclosure errors and a botched a security clearance form?"

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