Leonardo DiCaprio, Oscar-winning actor and climate justice crusader, is also a notorious fan of private jets. Last year, he flew from Cannes to New York to pick up an environmental award at the Riverkeeper Fishermen’s Ball before heading directly back to France for the annual amfAR gala, where he gave a speech—an 8,000-mile round-trip, which prompted Page Six to shout, “Hypocrite!”

But this year, DiCaprio plans to fly commercial to the fourth annual gala for his eponymous foundation, the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, which supports efforts to preserve ocean and land habitats, to protect the rights of indigenous peoples, and to remedy climate change. According to Page Six, seemingly the authority on this subject, DiCaprio will forego the private jet for once—while the gala itself, which takes place in Saint-Tropez, will feature a sustainably sourced pescatarian meal.

Last year’s gala, attended by the likes of Doutzen Kroes, Anja Rubik, Joan Smalls, Edward Norton, and more, and with performances by Lana Del Rey and The Weeknd, raked in $45 million to support its various programs. In addition to lending his name to the foundation, he’s also an outspoken supporter of environmental causes: “Climate change is real. It is happening right now, it is the most urgent threat facing our entire species,” DiCaprio said during his acceptance speech for the Academy Award for Best Actor, which he won for his performance in The Revenant.

Since The Revenant premiered two years ago, he’s primarily dedicated himself to producing environmentally oriented documentaries like the Oscar nominee Virunga and Fisher Stevens’s Before the Flood—that is, aside from the two new true-crime thrillers he's developing with Martin Scorsese. He attended the Climate March earlier this year. And he’s declared himself “CarbonNeutral,” which basically means that he offsets all that airtime in private jets by planting trees in Mexico.

But his prolific use of private jets and other, luxurious modes of travel—he took a cruise on the fifth-largest yacht in the world, owned by an oil tycoon from the United Arab Emirates, to watch the 2014 World Cup—seem like a rebuttal to his climate advocacy. (“In case you are wondering, neither the jets nor the yacht run on solar power,” a Forbes contributor wrote last year.) This year, he will bravely go commercial, making a chivalrous gesture towards global warming.

He’s not exempted from planting more trees in Mexico this year, though: As the recent New York magazine cover story of apocalyptic doom noted, “Every round-trip ticket on flights from New York to London, keep in mind, costs the Arctic three more square meters of ice.”

A brief guide to everyone Leonardo DiCaprio has dated: