Whether it's curating, collecting, writing, dealing or all of the above, these five trailblazing women are making big moves in the art world.

Cloé Perrone, Curator

Photograph by Hugues Laurent; styled by Rogelio Burgos; hair by Tobias Sagner at Calliste Agency; makeup by Eny Whitehead at Calliste Agency.

After her yearlong internship at the New Museum that focused on the emerging art scene, Cloé Perrone returned home to Rome in 2010 to become an assistant curator at the MAXXI National Museum of 21st Century Arts. “I got to know the artists of my generation,” says Perrone, 30, who is now a curator at the Fondazione Memmo Arte Contemporanea, Rome’s first private art foundation, where she has worked on shows by Sara VanDerBeek, Sterling Ruby, Shannon Ebner, and Camille Henrot. In November she oversaw the up-and-coming artists booths at Artissima, Turin’s contemporary art fair, and in September she unveiled “The Commodification of Love,” at Kamel Mennour gallery, in Paris, in which artists explored the meaning of love in a digital world and, she says, “whether algorithms know us better than we know ourselves.”

Tiffany Zabludowicz, Curator and Collector

Photographs by Martien Mulder; Styled by Sarah Zendejas

Growing up in London surrounded by her family’s extensive collection, it was only natural that Tiffany Zabludowicz would catch the art bug early. “People would come to our house to tour the art, and I was this little kid showing them around,” recalls Zabludowicz, 25. When she is not helping to build the Zabludowicz Family Collection focusing on younger artists such as Jon Rafman, Brad Troemel, and Rachel Rossin, she works as an independent curator, a passion given wings while studying art history at Brown University. Since graduating in 2014, she has curated a show with the Brooklyn-based collective The Stillhouse Group, organized a ceramics show at Leila Heller gallery, held an artist residency program in Times Square, and worked with MoMA PS1 director Klaus Biesenbach as his co-curator for an arts festival in Puerto Rico this past January. Recently, she curated a show in Times Square focusing on female sculptors. “It’s important never to focus too much on one movement or artist. You have to be open to everything.”

Laura de Gunzburg, Art Liaison

Photographs by Martien Mulder; Styled by Sarah Zendejas

As a French literature major at the University of Miami, Laura de Gunzburg couldn’t imagine following in the footsteps of her mother, Nathalie, a collector and chairman of the board at the Dia Art Foundation—until an internship at the Margulies Collection, in 2010, made her reconsider. “Marty Margulies made art very emotional and relatable,” says de Gunzburg, 27, who went on to a two-year stint at Sotheby’s as a corporate-collections manager. In 2015 she left Sotheby’s to join their former chairman in starting the Cultivist, a global arts club which provides high-end access to the art world. On her free time from serving as their director of global membership, De Gunzburg edits a column for Cultured Magazine in which she highlights upcoming art shows, and also chairs the Dia Foundation’s young patrons program. “I always thought I was going to do something completely different from my mom, but I couldn't be happier than to share this with her now.”

Lolita Cros, Curator and Art Dealer

Photographs by Martien Mulder; Styled by Sarah Zendejas; Hair by Takuya Sugarawa at Walter Schupfer Management; Makeup by Rika Shimada for Chanel At Defacto; Photography Assistant: Frank Muller

A New York storefront, a rooftop, and the back of a parked truck are just a few of the locations where New York–based curator Lolita Cros, 26, has held shows for emerging artists. “I’m offering a more democratic way of looking at art,” explains Cros, who studied art history at Bard College and curated her first big show prior to graduating, exhibiting works by Dustin Yellin, Rachel Rossin, and Jemima Kirke in a Chinese restaurant. “I liked the way people interacted with the art—it felt less contrived, more organic.” She is the art curator for The Wing, the women-only club, and will host an event during Miami Art Basel this month with Daniel Arsham and Heron Preston. When she’s not on the lookout for the next new artist, the Paris native moderates a speaking series at Hôtel Americano, inviting creatives such as Peter McGough, Duane Michals and Peter Saul.

Roya Sachs, Curator

Sachs wears Khite shirt and skirt; Caterina Zangrando rings.

Photographs by Martien Mulder; Styled by Sarah Zendejas; Hair by Takuya Sugarawa at Walter Schupfer Management; Makeup by Rika Shimada for Chanel At Defacto; Photography Assistant: Frank Muller

“There was always art around, and I was always passionate about it,” says Roya Sachs, the granddaughter of famed industrialist Gunter Sachs, and daughter of designer Rolf Sachs. So it was with strong purpose that Sachs pursued a career in curating upon graduating from New York University with a degree in Art History in 2013. Raised in London, Sachs, 26, has brought mixed-media performances to ­institutions such as LAMB Arts, Mana Contemporary, and Performa. This past spring, art world heavy-hitters Aby Rosen and Alberto Mugrabi tapped her to be the curator of the Lever House Art ­Collection; she kicked things off with a show by the Brooklyn-based artist ­Katherine ­Bernhardt. In December, during Art Basel Miami Beach, Sachs and her co-curator, Mafalda Millies, will reprise ­Virtually There, a performance they directed that riffs on Oskar ­Schlemmer’s famous 1922 Bauhaus-inspired Triadic Ballet, about man’s relationship to the machine. “I like art that makes a statement, I don’t care if you love it or hate, I just want to take people out of their comfort zones.

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