COPENHAGEN FASHION WEEK

Danish Stylist Pernille Teisbaek Breaks Down the Three Jewelry Brands You Need to Know

The Danish super star stylist shares her favorite pieces.


Christian Vierig

“When it comes to my outfits, I’m not particularly colorful or crazy, so for me, jewelry is something that creates a personal touch,” explained Pernille Teisbaek, Copenhagen’s hottest stylist, between sips of white wine at Apollo Bar, the capital’s newest watering hole. “When you have a piece that stands out, it helps create a look,” she continued. “At the moment, I’m almost more excited about Danish jewelry than I am about the clothing.” According to Teisbaek, this is due in part to the number of new jewelry brands popping up, and how, for the first time, Scandinavian people are embracing jewelry for its minimalism, which is key tenant of Northern aesthetic. “I used to wear more personal things, like a wedding ring or something given to me by my fiancé, but now I’ll wear jewelry as statement pieces.” With all the new brands cropping up on the scene, Teisbaek has singled out her three favorites, exclusively for W. “What I love about these designers is that they’re very identifiable. There’s no doubt that Sophie Bille Brahe made this, or Griegst made that. They all meet in this amazing mix,” In honor of the end of Copenhagen Fashion Week, Teisback breaks it down.

Griegst

Pernille’s favorite gold ring from Griegst

“Greigst made my wedding band—the ring is called ‘Cosmos,’ which is two units intertwined. It’s a husband and wife duo, Arje and Irene. I love the more organic shapes, and casual nature. It’s not as polished as you would see with a brand like Tiffany’s; it’s more low key, even though it’s also very heavy. I love jewelry I can wear every day and not take off. I need jewelry that isn’t too refined, and blends in with having a baby boy, carrying bags to stylists—all these practical things I have to deal with every day. I also love creating contrasts between pieces, wearing something small and dainty in between chunkier ones to make it slightly more playful. My husband’s wedding band is also from Griegst, but Irene, the wife of the couple, made it. And Arje, the husband, made mine. I really love that idea.”

Orit Elhanati

Pernille’s wedding ring from Orit Elhanati

I did a jewelry collaboration with Orit a year ago, which is still out now, called Afin Atelier. It’s not seen many places, which for me is also quite special. She’s a huge talent, and very organic in her shapes. Her jewelry is constantly evolving and developing itself, and she has a great eye for different shapes, such as waves and curves, and she draws heavily from the underworld. Our Afin Atelier collaboration was also inspired by the underworld, we did many iterations of gold sea shells. We want to continue to develop it, I just haven’t had that much time since I’ve been moving houses and pregnant! But she’s such a talent, and I believe she will be the new thing, and a designer I’ll see many places – she’s already sold at Matches, and Browns in London.

Sophie Bille Brahe

Earrings from Sophie Bille Brahe

Sophie’s dainty style is already so copied everywhere! She uses tons of pearls and she’s very refined in her work. She has so much humor in her way of making pieces and doing things. She makes these beautiful gold and silver small animals, and has this charm that is shaped as Africa, which I wear around my neck. She’s constantly developing herself, doing these small dainty pieces, or big diamond earrings. Sometimes she does pieces that are almost vulgar, and not very Danish which I think are great, but she balances it with this great Scandinavian touch that is very refined. There is really something for everyone. You can buy a simple necklace, but also something that is Russian in style – she’s pretty cool, pretty divine.

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Three years ago, at the age of nineteen, Cathrine Saks and Barbara Potts launched their eponymous line. “We want to keep our collections funny and young, because we are still so young,” explained Saks, who helmed her own jewelry line before partnering with Potts, who was a writer for ELLE Denmark at the time. “We talked about starting our own line, it was really natural for us.” With no formal training and only a few years in the game, their fur coats have already become a hot ticket item amongst editors and influencers who proudly donned their ‘Phoebe’ coat at international fashion weeks last season. “We couldn’t find a fun-colored fur,” said Saks, “so we decided to make one ourselves.” Tourism and wanderlust inspired their SS18 collection which is comprised of colorful separates such as dresses, heavily bowed blouses, and track pants. Their newest additions are swimwear and jewelry. “We want to keep it simple, follow our hearts, and make pieces we would want to wear ourselves.”

Photo by Nikolaj Møller at Blink Production, styled by Caroline Grosso. Hair & Makeup by Monika Grensteen at Le Management. Photo Assitant Alexander Brunebjerg at The Lab. Special thanks to Stig Ruge at Imagework.

Throughout the last seven years designing menswear, Astrid Anderson has found the perfect medium between comfort and luxury. “I believe power comes from feeling comfortable and confident,” said Andersen, who debuted her second collection of womenswear in an abandoned factory in Copenhagen last week. “It’s a sports-inspired aesthetic with a luxury approach.” Her menswear roots were evident, with androgynous, oversized wide-legged silhouettes which she feminized with bright, turquoise chinoiserie prints. The designer, who admitted she is most inspired by textures and fabrics, turned to hi-tech performance fabrics which she mixed with lace, silks and fur. All evidence shows she’s on the up and up—not only did she debut her first jewelry collaboration, but before her show, announced her first merch partnership with rapper M.I.A. “It’s a sports inspired aesthetic with a luxury approach.”

Photo by Nikolaj Møller at Blink Production, styled by Caroline Grosso. Hair & Makeup by Monika Grensteen at Le Management. Photo Assitant Alexander Brunebjerg at The Lab. Special thanks to Stig Ruge at Imagework.

After attending London’s Royal College of Art, designer Cecilie Bahnsen worked at various fashion houses in London and Paris before starting her own line in 2015. By her second season she caught the attention of Dover Street Market for her structured cotton dresses, and was an LVMH prize finalist in 2017. The wunderkind admits to fully embracing her Scandinavian heritage, maintaining a simple, clean aesthetic and constructing her pieces from crisp cottons which has remained a key material from her first season. Her newest collection is a more feminine take on her clean-cut aesthetic, adopting a more whimsical palette of pale pinks and ballooning, yet sophisticated, baby doll dresses. She said her biggest inspiration though, was the Gallery Nicolai Wall, the space where the show was held. “It was an amazing experience to design a collection to fit a space,” said Bahnsen, “each piece of clothing was designed as a work of art to fit inside the gallery, and I really think that made it all come together.”

Photo by Nikolaj Møller at Blink Production, styled by Caroline Grosso. Hair & Makeup by Monika Grensteen at Le Management. Photo Assitant Alexander Brunebjerg at The Lab. Special thanks to Stig Ruge at Imagework.

After attending London’s Royal College of Art, designer Cecilie Bahnsen worked at various fashion houses in London and Paris before starting her own line in 2015. By her second season she caught the attention of Dover Street Market for her structured cotton dresses, and was an LVMH prize finalist in 2017. The wunderkind admits to fully embracing her Scandinavian heritage, maintaining a simple, clean aesthetic and constructing her pieces from crisp cottons which has remained a key material from her first season. Her newest collection is a more feminine take on her clean-cut aesthetic, adopting a more whimsical palette of pale pinks and ballooning, yet sophisticated, baby doll dresses. She said her biggest inspiration though, was the Gallery Nicolai Wall, the space where the show was held. “It was an amazing experience to design a collection to fit a space,” said Bahnsen, “each piece of clothing was designed as a work of art to fit inside the gallery, and I really think that made it all come together.”

Photo by Nikolaj Møller at Blink Production, styled by Caroline Grosso. Hair & Makeup by Monika Grensteen at Le Management. Photo Assitant Alexander Brunebjerg at The Lab. Special thanks to Stig Ruge at Imagework.

Upon graduating from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp five years ago, a school which has birthed such fashion greats as Anne Demeulemeester, Dries Van Noten, and Demna Gvasalia, Danish designer Freya Dalsjø launched her namesake line. While she has a lust-worthy ready-to-wear collection, Dalsjø is best known for her reinterpretation of the classic trenchcoat, which comes in six different materials and colorways, such as red leather, cream cotton, and brown patent. “This season I wanted to look back at all my work, find my favorite pieces and develop from that,” she explained of her period of self-retrospection, which informed her Spring 2017 collection. Kylie Jenner wore her recent biker pants, and she’s made clothes for Rihanna. “For me, creating clothing is always about making a statement and then a counter statement. It’s about creating harmony and then breaking it until you have a good balance.”

Photo by Nikolaj Møller at Blink Production, styled by Caroline Grosso. Hair & Makeup by Monika Grensteen at Le Management. Photo Assitant Alexander Brunebjerg at The Lab. Special thanks to Stig Ruge at Imagework.

In 2002, Karl-Oskar Olsen and Brian Jensen, launched Wood Wood from a makeshift basement office with nothing but a fax machine and a landline. They have since become the toast of the town (they also have a store in Berlin), and are considered to be the Colette of Copenhagen, known for their frequently sold-out namesake streetwear collection, as well as their inventive collaborations with companies ranging from Disney, to Barbour, to Champion, and as of last week, Adidas. Wood Wood’s collection of puffer jackets, sophisticated track pants, and iterations of workwear have secured them a place on the international fashion map. The brand, which is currently celebrating its fifteenth anniversary, concluded Copenhagen Fashion Week with a blowout block party that featured a live performance by MØ herself.

Photo by Nikolaj Møller at Blink Production, styled by Caroline Grosso. Hair & Makeup by Monika Grensteen at Le Management. Photo Assitant Alexander Brunebjerg at The Lab. Special thanks to Stig Ruge at Imagework.

In 2002, Karl-Oskar Olsen and Brian Jensen, launched Wood Wood from a makeshift basement office with nothing but a fax machine and a landline. They have since become the toast of the town (they also have a store in Berlin), and are considered to be the Colette of Copenhagen, known for their frequently sold-out namesake streetwear collection, as well as their inventive collaborations with companies ranging from Disney, to Barbour, to Champion, and as of last week, Adidas. Wood Wood’s collection of puffer jackets, sophisticated track pants, and iterations of workwear have secured them a place on the international fashion map. The brand, which is currently celebrating its fifteenth anniversary, concluded Copenhagen Fashion Week with a blowout block party that featured a live performance by MØ herself.

Photo by Nikolaj Møller at Blink Production, styled by Caroline Grosso. Hair & Makeup by Monika Grensteen at Le Management. Photo Assitant Alexander Brunebjerg at The Lab. Special thanks to Stig Ruge at Imagework.
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