Fiona Apple and St. Vincent's music may differ, but they do share at least one thing in common: they're both strong-minded indie trailblazers, fully in control of their own art. Luckily for fans of both, they got to witness that in action over the weekend when the '90s icon brought out Annie Clark for a surprise set at Trans-Pecos Festival in Marfa, as Pitchfork reports.

"Fiona. I have no words. You saved my life. Thank you. I will love you forever," Annie Clark later wrote on Instagram, sharing a picture of the two. The rest of the room was left nearly speechless as well when they performed several songs. One of those was "Pale September," a deep cut from Apple's 1996 debut album Tidal, which became the alternative singer's breakthrough. The two also performed Cyndi Lauper's cult classic, the 1984 song "Money Changes Everything" from her debut album She's So Unusual. Naturally, the results were magical.

This isn't the first time St. Vincent has covered Lauper. The '80s pop figure is becoming somewhat of a go-to for Clark during impromptu performances, as she also covered one of her songs five years ago alongside Lauper herself as well as Rosie O'Donnell and Sleigh Bells' Alexis Krauss during a True Colors Fund event that benefitted homeless LGBT youth, as seen below.

St. Vincent is currently gearing up for the release of her upcoming album, Masseduction, her fifth one (including the 2012 collaborative one she did with David Byrne called Love This Giant). "It’s all about sex and drugs and sadness," she told The New Yorker about her new album. The first taste of it "New York" confirms that, as Clark revealed that it was inspired by some of 2016's deaths that rattled her. "It’s very silly to make something like David Bowie’s death about me—it has nothing to do with me—but I will say that I was really affected," she told "Song Exploder" Podcast. "And I cried. I cried for somebody I didn’t even know. And I don’t know that I’ve done that before."

She has also talked about the song "Pills"—the one her ex Cara Delevigne sings on under the moniker Kid Monkey—which she hasn't released from Masseduction yet, telling The New Yorker, "I was trying to hold on/ I didn’t have coping mechanisms for tremendous anxiety and depression. I was trying to get through pharmaceutically."

Watch: Cara Delevingne Does ASMR, Revealing How She Got Into Character For 'Suicide Squad'