Models wearing beige corduroy.

What Exactly Is Drew House, Justin Bieber's Mysterious New Unisex Clothing Line?

Justin Bieber loves Christmas. In 2017, he got into the holiday spirit by driving a custom festive SUV around Los Angeles, and this past year, he spread the cheer by at long last making Drew House, his mysterious clothing line, available to the public. And the public gobbled it up with glee. It had, after all, been a long time coming: Bieber trademarked the words "Drew," "The House of Drew," and "La Maison Drew" (ooh la la!) last February, but maintained his silence on the label for the months and months that followed.

That ended, however, in late December, when Bieber dropped a capsule collection of so-called "Cheap Hotel Slippers," which, accordingly, retailed for $4.99. Needless to say, it wasn't long before the affordable footwear, which bore an "iconic smiley face design," had entirely sold out.

Why, exactly, the smiley face, which features the word "Drew" in place of a mouth, was being considered "iconic" remained to be seen. In fact, it still remains to be seen, even though yesterday saw the still mysterious label, which now has more than 160,000 Instagram followers, release its debut collection. We've also been gifted with a description of Drew House—kind of. According to its website, which favors the lowercase: "drew house is a place where you can be yourself. blah blah blah blahsdbksjdfhl wear like you don't care. come chill. k. bye."

If there's anything you can glean from that, it's that the label is intent on keeping the mystery alive. While it details information about international customs and duties and their use of your "personal information," Bieber's name is nowhere to be found. Nor is that of Bieber's former "swagger coach," Ryan Good, who appears to be even more involved in Drew House than Bieber is.

So, what exactly is going on here? Let's start with the obvious: Drew happens to be Bieber's middle name. (And "House of Drew" happens to be one way to circumvent the fact that a 19th-century bed-and-breakfast in Ontario has already claimed the "Drew House" domain.)

If at this point you're trying to decide whether it's worth your time to join us in this investigation, ask yourself a question that (we hope, anyway) you've never considered before: Do you have any strong feelings about the fact that Bieber is now selling $138 shorts that allow you to broadcast his middle name across a certain section of your lower half? Whether you kept this tab open because you're a Bieber stan or simply out of morbid curiosity, it may interest you to know that there's more where that came from.

Take, for example, the three additional corduroy, camel, and apparently Carhartt-inspired garments, like a $148 pair of pants that are "garment washed and dyed, making them unique, just like you," and "perfect for doing the kinds of things you'd normally do while wearing pants." (Each is labeled "Chaz," apparently as a tribute to Chaz Somers, Bieber's childhood friend.)

The rest of the items are tops, which, like the Chaz items, are also unisex and apparently "ethically made" in limited quantities in Los Angeles. Each is emblazoned with the word "Drew" and split up into two groups: those featuring the smiley face logo, titled "Mascot," and those featuring just the brand name, titled "Secret." While it's mostly hoodies and T-shirts, there's also a black turtleneck that's described as "what a young, chill steve jobs might have worn."

Those cutesy descriptions appear to be working: Less than 24 hours after the collection was made available, all of the items had sold out. Plus, as an added bonus, each comes with an informational factoid like "polar bears can eat as many as 86 penguins in a single sitting," or "7% of american adults believe that chocolate milk comes from brown cows."

To be fair, Bieber deserves as much credit as his copywriter: Since October, he's been making like Yeezy by wearing Drew House out and about—especially in front of the paparazzi. Naturally, his wife, Hailey Bieber (née Baldwin), has followed suit, including on her Instagram. (She admittedly used the hashtag "#houseofdrew," rather than "#drewhouse," but luckily, as this infographic helpfully demonstrates, Bieber's comrades Good and Scooter Braun made up for that with helping him get the word out.)

The debut collection, however, marked the label's foray into turning to noncelebrities for help: They enlisted a group of relatively unknown models to help out with their e-commerce—as well as a couple who, if you squint your eyes, you may mistake for Justin or Hailey.

Is that really all there is to it—slippers and corduroy? Thankfully, that remains to be seen. Drew House will, after all, have to replenish its stock eventually. (And hopefully eventually a bit more inventively.) For the time being, feel free to investigate the hints that Drew House is expanding into snack foods, join the haters in decrying Drew House's radical increase in price, or contribute to the growing number of Drew House memes.

Related: A Recap of Justin Bieber's Beef With 15-Year-Old Jojo Siwa, Starting With His Demand to Burn Her Car