After cutting ties with her parents, "hiding out," and moving in with her boyfriend, Olivia Jade Giannulli is reportedly inching closer to reconciling with her mom Lori Loughlin, in the wake of the cheating scandal which put a public microscope on their lives. Apparently, the mother and daughter are "in communication" now.

Over the past month, Olivia Jade has reportedly began to shift her perspective from being angry at her parents' actions to empathizing with them. “Olivia was angry with her parents at first, but now realizes that they were just trying to do what’s best for her,” a source told Us Weekly. “Olivia loves her mom and dad very much, but is especially close with Lori.”

It's also the investigation, though, which has started to reunite her with her mom and dad, Mossimo Giannulli, who is also being charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud, as well as a new charge of money laundering due to the fact that he and Loughlin rejected a plea deal that would have required the married couple to serve 18 to 24 months of jail time. “They decided to roll the dice,” as one source previously explained, “and it may have been a bad gamble. Now they’re in worse shape than before."

That state includes now having the investigation opened up to their daughters, Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose, who were accepted into USC after their parents allegedly paid $500,000 in bribes. Last week it was rumored that Olivia Jade could be investigated by the Department of Justice because she was allegedly aware of the crew team scam. Now, a source at Us Weekly is confirming that possibility: It's also the threat of being investigated that's bringing Olivia Jade closer to her mom. Both she and her sister Isabella have reportedly lawyered up.

Outside of navigating her legal situation, though, Olivia Jade reportedly has another priority: “focusing on how to turn this around so she can be famous for the right reasons again." Maybe starting by accepting responsibility, acknowledging privilege, and working to create opportunities for other aspiring collegiates who don't have the means to pay their tuition.